The Truth About Trayvon and George – A Personal Story

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When I was 17 I went to stay at my uncle’s house. He lived in a mostly black neighborhood but people were friendly enough and I felt pretty at ease there as a white teenager. One night I went to the shop to get a drink and on my way back this black dude started following me. I looked over at him, he was creeping me out and then I just had this gut instinct and decided to run.

I thought I’d managed to lose him, but this guy suddenly reappeared. I realized I’d have to stand my ground (as my Dad had taught me) and so I punched him in the face (always get that first punch in). That stunned him but this black guy came back at me and a full-on fight started.

After grappling on the wet ground (it was raining) I managed to get the upper hand. We’d rolled on to this concrete path and I slammed his head down onto it, hoping he’d give up. That was when he managed to pull out a gun and shot me in the chest at point-blank range.

After I died I found out he’d thought I was going to steal something from one of the houses – apparently there had been some burglaries by white kids coming into the neighborhood recently. But I was only visiting for a few days and didn’t know anything about that. I guess he just assumed I was one of them.

Ok, I admit I maybe would have taken something if it was easy, I was no angel back then. But that night I hadn’t done anything.

I also found out this black guy was some kind of neighborhood watch. He was just trying to make the area safer and apparently he even helped white kids in the past who were having problems. I can respect that. But that night he took me for one of the burglars because of how I was dressed and the color of my skin.

After he killed me, there was a trial. He tried to plead self-defense but it turned out the 911 dispatcher had told him not to follow me – he’d called them before we had the fight and said “These assholes, they always get away.”

Even though I threw the first punch, the jury of course realized that this black dude armed with a loaded gun had no business going to confront an unarmed white kid, even if he thought I was up to no good. I’d still be alive if he’d never gotten out his car and followed me. It wasn’t my fault I was winning the fight before he shot me. He got 25 years in state prison.

When the judge passed sentence, this black neighborhood watch guy got pretty angry and shouted that if he’d been white, and I’d been black, he’d have been found innocent. The judge said the law is applied equally to all Americans, whatever their race.

Even though I’m glad he went to prison, because he did something wrong and killed me over nothing, I can’t help feeling he might be right. If he was white, they would have said he was defending himself in our fistfight and ignored how he profiled me.

But I guess we’ll never know if that’s how the system really works.

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7 thoughts on “The Truth About Trayvon and George – A Personal Story

  1. shannoninmiami

    “Ok, I admit I maybe would have taken something if it was easy, I was no angel back then. But that night I hadn’t done anything”

    this sentence- sentiment, is exactly what went wrong with this whole case. the defendant thought he knew what Trayvon was about, the defense lawyers thought they knew who Trayvon was, the media thought they knew who Trayvon was and the jury thought they could read Trayvon’s mind. everyone thought the worst about this kid. why? why would anyone believe the worst about a dead kid without ANY proof what so ever? I wouldn’t, especially in a situation like this.

    I would never think that about that particular young kid I saw dead, laid out on the ground with a hollow point stuck in HIS heart- NOT in the defendant’s heart. If the bullet was in the defendant’s heart maybe i’d think differently, since it takes a special kinda person to carry a gun, locked and loaded, with the attitude openly displayed to the NEN dispatcher, to then follow an individual he himself identified as a teenager. it takes a special kinda man to believe he had the right to say and do ALL the things he admits to before the killing and afterwards. so it wasn’t the kid with the questionable behavior like the defendant wants us to believe.
    It was the one with the gun. the one with the violent criminal past. not the one with the bullet in his heart. that one was a 17yo walking home from the store with skittles and soda, with a pink heart shaped sticker on his phone, wearing a cheap kid’s blue plastic watch on his slight wrist, and sweatshirt and khakis who made the effort to rolled up the cuffs of his pants that day.

    it’s just a shame people have swallowed the defense’s blame the victim narrative hook line and sinker. it’s a shame no one got up on the stand and defended this kid’s character, his honor. it’s a shame no one mentioned the killer’s reputation for harassing others and documented aggression. instead the victim’s supposed, suspected, imagined criminality was inferred and apparently believed by everyone with a voice in this case!

    Reply
  2. Pingback: The Truth About Trayvon and George – A Personal Story | ShannonInMiami

  3. bernasvibe

    @”It was the one with the gun. the one with the violent criminal past. not the one with the bullet in his heart. that one was a 17yo walking home from the store with skittles and soda, with a pink heart shaped sticker on his phone, wearing a cheap kid’s blue plastic watch on his slight wrist, and sweatshirt and khakis who made the effort to rolled up the cuffs of his pants that day.

    it’s just a shame people have swallowed the defense’s blame the victim narrative hook line and sinker. it’s a shame no one got up on the stand and defended this kid’s character, his honor. it’s a shame no one mentioned the killer’s reputation for harassing others and documented aggression. instead the victim’s supposed, suspected, imagined criminality was inferred and apparently believed by everyone with a voice in this case!..”>> I totally agree with every single word..Indeed! Very well said/expressed…

    Reply
  4. CherokeeNative (@CherokeeNative3)

    Go back and read every instance where Zimmerman has had problems, whether with his ex-fiancé, the undercover police, the coworker, Trayvon, his wife, and most recently, his mistress. In each instance, George has reversed the facts, turning the story around to make himself the victim. It’s his M.O. Like his coworker said, Zimmerman is so convincing in reversing his story that even he questioned what had really occurred even though he knew better.

    George knows he’s a murderer. O’Mara knows too, but it is his fault that George was not held accountable by going on a nonstop media campaign to thugify and vilify Trayvon – even telling the Court that Trayvon was involved in video taped fights that weren’t true. The blood of Trayvon is on O’Mara and George is breathing air that doesn’t belong to him.

    Reply
  5. Pingback: Themes in Gun Control Debate: Gun Deaths - Rhetoric on Gun Control

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